Add Calendar Event

When

Feb 14, 2018
6:30pm

Venue info

93 Main Coffee Shop

93 Main Coffee Shop, 93 Main St., Unity, ME

Price

$5 suggested donation

Contact

(207) 948-3766

A Local Conservation Context for Wood Turtles

January 26, 2018 – For Immediate Release

Contact: Doug Wescott, Sebasticook Regional Land Trust
Phone: 207­948­3766
Email: info@sebasticookrlt.org
Web: www.SebasticookRLT.org

A Local Conservation Context for Wood Turtles

SRLT Monthly Speaker Series Presents Greg LeClair, a senior from Unity College’s Wildlife Biology program, February 14, 6:30 PM, 93 Main Coffee House, Unity Maine

UNITY, Maine – The Wood Turtle is a beautiful, medium-sized turtle native to the Northeastern United States. The turtle can be found in or near Maine’s slow moving streams and rivers eating invertebrates and vegetation, but it currently appears to be declining throughout its range. Federal and state agencies are working hard to determine whether or not the turtle deserves to be listed as endangered – is this really the case?

Since 2015, Unity College students and professors have been tackling this question. Through field surveys, population viability analyses, and habitat assessments, a picture is slowly starting to develop as we gain a clearer understanding in our own local area.
Please join Greg LeClair, a senior from Unity College’s Wildlife Biology program, in a review of our local turtle population and a look at the future of Wood Turtles.

The programs are open to the public. A $5.00 donation is suggested. They take place on the second Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at 93 Main Coffee Shop, 93 Main St., Unity. For more information, please contact info@sebasticookrlt.org or 948-3766.

A $5 donation is suggested. For more information, please email info@sebasticookrlt.org or call 948-3766.

About Sebasticook Regional Land Trust
Sebasticook Regional Land Trust has a mission to recognize and conserve the rich wild and working landscape of Central Maine’s Sebasticook River watershed. We work with willing landowners to conserve the lands they love and the resources our community relies upon—clean water, family farms that provide local food and jobs, well­managed working forests, places to hunt, fish and play with our children.